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    We're doing a lot of re-organising and rethinking of the space we work in at the moment. It was subject to a massive redesign ten years ago but is starting to feel a bit stale (lockdown helped with that!) and this corner in particular has never been quite right. We've worked with Spencer Jenkins before on projects around the studio and the house, and when we realised it was shelving that we needed - for all the reference books, novels, catalogues and such, housed for years in repurposed wooden apple crates - we asked him. He loves wood, works in steel and willow, and creates natural forms and shapes which look simple and easy, but he'll pore over a line for for days on end, perfecting it. We'd been admirers of the work he's done in scorched larch, taking the wood and burning its surface till it reaches a deep, satisfying black. We chose chunky larch sections which were cut and planed to fit the totally asymmetrical and wobbly corners of the room (the studio is L-shaped). Once this was done - not a fast stage, it should be said, Spence is something of a perfectionist - the larch is burnt using a blowtorch and a steady hand. You can see the really gnarly, delicate-looking surface of the larch, which truly looks as if you've turned up to a house fire hours too late. And it smells like that too, if you get your nose right in there - an oddity exciting smell, proper 'charred'. After the charring, comes the vanishing - but sensitively done, so as not to obliterate the textures of the burning with a brutal slathering of shiny. Wet here, the varnish soaks in to 'fix' the burnt surface: Burnt only on the underside and the sides, leaving natural larch exposed on the surface where the books would sit, from here the shelves were brought to the studio where it was over to me. We'd come up with the idea of filling any natural cracks and splits with gold. Inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi, mending precious time-served items with gold and honouring their long service rather than throwing them away or trying to hide the breaks, I first photographed the shelves placed in situ and drew lines as organically as I could over the edges, many times over, till I hand line that neither told a story nor suggested any deliberate sequence, taking my cue from Spencer himself and the notion of a totally random break or split: harder than I first thought! In fact, it took me two weeks to arrive at a set of 'cracks' I was happy with, and even then, I changed them as I worked. I tested the infill of gold with the samples that Spencer had made for us, in the process of assessing how much to burn into the wood, by Dremelling the splits in and applying both gold leaf and two gold acrylics. The idea was to fill with actual gold, via melting and pouring in, or alternatively using a rod that's melted in (NOT the correct technical term) but after research this proved both financially and technically very difficult to achieve without the input of a jeweller and specialist kit, so we decided on 23ct gold leaf - the quality of leaf above which no oxidisation takes place, and suitable for outdoor use as well as indoor. IN THE MEANTIME...the empty space where the old crate shelves were stacked was looking sad, so it was given a fresh coat of ECOS white paint, and I added a set of coloured pencils to it! I sketched them out on paper with felt tips in what felt like the right colours, squatting and holding them up against the corner, until they were right. Feeling like a big child it was massively freeing to paint something large-scale on the wall - we haven't done that for AGES - and I added some pencils which were sharp, a snapped one, a blunt one and some sharpened with a knife - like a real pencil collection. Once this was done it was time to gild. Gilding requires the surface to be smooth, sealed and dry, before a coat of size - a type of glue which doubles as a varnish, and remains sticky for a few hours - is applied, followed by the leaf itself. Every crack was Dremelled in, slowly and with a non-blinking steady hand, brushed clean with a stiff brush, and then sealed with a PVA solution. When dry, a layer of Stuart Semple's 'Goldest Gold' acrylic was applied, chosen for being the truest, richest gold I've ever come across. The acrylic acts as a sealant, and ensured that should any area not be completely covered by the gold leaf, all you'll see is the convincingly-gold acrylic edge. I highly recommend his very special gold! And then the gold leaf. A time-consuming process (if it wasn't already!) the leaf is applied with a dry brush over size applied anywhere from an our beforehand. As long as it's still sticky, you can start gilding. A little section of VERY flaky gold leaf is picked up on a dry brush, and pushed into the crack, tamped down carefully with the same dry brush - never with fingers. Despite a surprisingly modest spend on the 23ct gold, I ALMOST left the acrylic exposed, such was its goodness and glitter. here's the acrylic on the left, and some of the gilding on the right. There's just more...goldness to the gold leaf! Finally, the completed shelves were fixed in place over the pencils, burnt, gold edges facing into the room, and the books have been making their way onto them this week; stylishly re-organised for the first time in years! We're grateful to Spence for his painstaking work, carried out in a distanced, awkward masks-and-googles-on way in the middle of a lockdown, and for the opportunity for another collaboration. The next project is already underway, and we already know there'll be more after that! You can explore more of Spencer's work on his Instagram account.

  • Fire, Pencils & Gold

    We're doing a lot of re-organising and rethinking of the space we work in at the moment. It was subject to a massive redesign ten years ago but is starting to feel a bit stale (lockdown helped with that!) and this corner in particular has never been quite right. We've worked with Spencer Jenkins before on projects around the studio and the house, and when we realised it was shelving that we needed - for all the reference books, novels, catalogues and such, housed for years in repurposed wooden apple crates - we asked him. He loves wood, works in steel and willow, and creates natural forms and shapes which look simple and easy, but he'll pore over a line for for days on end, perfecting it. We'd been admirers of the work he's done in scorched larch, taking the wood and burning its surface till it reaches a deep, satisfying black. We chose chunky larch sections which were cut and planed to fit the totally asymmetrical and wobbly corners of the room (the studio is L-shaped). Once this was done - not a fast stage, it should be said, Spence is something of a perfectionist - the larch is burnt using a blowtorch and a steady hand. You can see the really gnarly, delicate-looking surface of the larch, which truly looks as if you've turned up to a house fire hours too late. And it smells like that too, if you get your nose right in there - an oddity exciting smell, proper 'charred'. After the charring, comes the vanishing - but sensitively done, so as not to obliterate the textures of the burning with a brutal slathering of shiny. Wet here, the varnish soaks in to 'fix' the burnt surface: Burnt only on the underside and the sides, leaving natural larch exposed on the surface where the books would sit, from here the shelves were brought to the studio where it was over to me. We'd come up with the idea of filling any natural cracks and splits with gold. Inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi, mending precious time-served items with gold and honouring their long service rather than throwing them away or trying to hide the breaks, I first photographed the shelves placed in situ and drew lines as organically as I could over the edges, many times over, till I hand line that neither told a story nor suggested any deliberate sequence, taking my cue from Spencer himself and the notion of a totally random break or split: harder than I first thought! In fact, it took me two weeks to arrive at a set of 'cracks' I was happy with, and even then, I changed them as I worked. I tested the infill of gold with the samples that Spencer had made for us, in the process of assessing how much to burn into the wood, by Dremelling the splits in and applying both gold leaf and two gold acrylics. The idea was to fill with actual gold, via melting and pouring in, or alternatively using a rod that's melted in (NOT the correct technical term) but after research this proved both financially and technically very difficult to achieve without the input of a jeweller and specialist kit, so we decided on 23ct gold leaf - the quality of leaf above which no oxidisation takes place, and suitable for outdoor use as well as indoor. IN THE MEANTIME...the empty space where the old crate shelves were stacked was looking sad, so it was given a fresh coat of ECOS white paint, and I added a set of coloured pencils to it! I sketched them out on paper with felt tips in what felt like the right colours, squatting and holding them up against the corner, until they were right. Feeling like a big child it was massively freeing to paint something large-scale on the wall - we haven't done that for AGES - and I added some pencils which were sharp, a snapped one, a blunt one and some sharpened with a knife - like a real pencil collection. Once this was done it was time to gild. Gilding requires the surface to be smooth, sealed and dry, before a coat of size - a type of glue which doubles as a varnish, and remains sticky for a few hours - is applied, followed by the leaf itself. Every crack was Dremelled in, slowly and with a non-blinking steady hand, brushed clean with a stiff brush, and then sealed with a PVA solution. When dry, a layer of Stuart Semple's 'Goldest Gold' acrylic was applied, chosen for being the truest, richest gold I've ever come across. The acrylic acts as a sealant, and ensured that should any area not be completely covered by the gold leaf, all you'll see is the convincingly-gold acrylic edge. I highly recommend his very special gold! And then the gold leaf. A time-consuming process (if it wasn't already!) the leaf is applied with a dry brush over size applied anywhere from an our beforehand. As long as it's still sticky, you can start gilding. A little section of VERY flaky gold leaf is picked up on a dry brush, and pushed into the crack, tamped down carefully with the same dry brush - never with fingers. Despite a surprisingly modest spend on the 23ct gold, I ALMOST left the acrylic exposed, such was its goodness and glitter. here's the acrylic on the left, and some of the gilding on the right. There's just more...goldness to the gold leaf! Finally, the completed shelves were fixed in place over the pencils, burnt, gold edges facing into the room, and the books have been making their way onto them this week; stylishly re-organised for the first time in years! We're grateful to Spence for his painstaking work, carried out in a distanced, awkward masks-and-googles-on way in the middle of a lockdown, and for the opportunity for another collaboration. The next project is already underway, and we already know there'll be more after that! You can explore more of Spencer's work on his Instagram account.

  • Grow Your Blog Community

    With Wix Blog, you’re not only sharing your voice with the world, you can also grow an active online community. That’s why the Wix blog comes with a built-in members area - so that readers can easily sign easily up to become members of your blog. What can members do? Members can follow each other, write and reply to comments and receive blog notifications. Each member gets their own personal profile page that they can customize. Tip: You can make any member of your blog a writer so they can write posts for your blog. Adding multiple writers is a great way to grow your content and keep it fresh and diversified. Here’s how to do it: Head to your Member’s Page Search for the member you want to make a writer Click on the member’s profile Click the 3 dot icon ( ⠇) on the Follow button Select Set as Writer

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  • Contact | Inkymole

    sarah@inkymole.com +44 (0) 7941 279374 If you’re in the USA and would rather talk to my agent about working together, please email Matthew or Chase at Bernstein Andriulli - they’re my New York-based management agency, and they look after all my North American work. I have to be really selective about what personal projects I choose to do (wedding invites, tattoos and so on) because as the old saying doesn’t go, ' The Spirit Is Willing But The Schedule Probably Won’t Allow It’. Do ask , though; if I can, and I’d like to, I will. I’ve put together answers here to some of the questions I get asked by email/social media, so check these out before you email. I'll answer any email you send me, but it’ll be when I can fit it in, which might mean you don’t get a reply straight away. I do expect a thank you (you’d be surprised how many don’t say thanks!) and a copy of whatever easy/project I’ve helped contribute to. I’d love to see it. If you’re thinking of featuring my work (or me and my work) in your magazine or blog, I can oblige! I’m always happy to contribute if I like the publication, whether printed or online. Just contact me direct . If you just want to feature some of work without interview, please ask before doing so, and always, always credit the work properly. If in doubt, ask. If you need mugshots, you can use any of these - and I can send hi-res should you need them. ​

  • Inkymole | Illustration & Lettering by Sarah J. Coleman

    with a pseudonym that evolved before I’d left school. I create words and pictures - and ink is my weapon of choice! With a handsome roster of clients in advertising, design and music, and working for every major publisher in the UK and US, I’ve had solo exhibitions both sides of the Atlantic while delving into myriad extra-curricular projects. Having cut my teeth working weekends at a pirate radio station, I’m currently a regular contributor to BBC Radio. Sarah is a delight to work with . Her enthusiasm, experience and pure talent make her the consummate professional. She consistently goes above and beyond what we ask of her; I am often surprised by unexpected extra touches in her work. In addition to an incredible final result, you can expect flexibility, good communication, and genuine passion. She really loves what she does...and it shows! ~ Sally Morgridge, Snr. Editor, Holiday House Books ​ 'Wake Up!' from Only if You Dare by Josh Allen & Sarah J. Coleman Harvest Magazine, California Andrea Gibson prints, pen and ink 'Wake Up!' from Only if You Dare by Josh Allen & Sarah J. Coleman 1/20 Clients include Apple / Adobe / Playboy / Tiffany / Coca-Cola / Macy’s / Starbucks / Toyota / AMVBBDO / TBWA / Crayola / Kelloggs / Wall Street Journal / Washington P ost / New York Times / Cadbury's / London Stock Exchange / Vogue / Saa tchi & Saatchi / Folio Society / The Natural History Museum and all major publishing houses // See a full list It's always delightful to work with Sarah Coleman . We've commissioned her ebullient illustrations on several projects now, and her creativity, professionalism and delivery have exceeded expectations every time. - Jackie Burrell, Bay Area News Group Watch the latest Adobe Live Classes Read the newest blog Autumn Reading: 'Only If You Dare' Listen to the latest Radio Show Check out new stuff in the shop Still wearing your mask? Get an inky one!

  • Work | Inkymole

    Books Everything Else Illustrated Books Classic Books Middle Grade Books Sci-fi & Fantasy Biographies Non-fiction Books Young Adult Books Horror & Supernatural Novels New Poetry Books Audiobooks All Fiction Advertising Editorial Logos Music Motion Design Design for Film & Games Walls Museum/Experiential Personal Work Pharmaceutical Tattoos Art & Gallery Projects

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