Search Results

60 items found

Blog Posts (5)

  • Next blog

    We're doing a lot of re-organising and rethinking of the space we work in at the moment. It was subject to a massive redesign ten years ago but is starting to feel a bit stale (lockdown helped with that!) and this corner in particular has never been quite right. We've worked with Spencer Jenkins before on projects around the studio and the house, and when we realised it was shelving that we needed - for all the reference books, novels, catalogues and such, housed for years in repurposed wooden apple crates - we asked him. He loves wood, works in steel and willow, and creates natural forms and shapes which look simple and easy, but he'll pore over a line for for days on end, perfecting it. We'd been admirers of the work he's done in scorched larch, taking the wood and burning its surface till it reaches a deep, satisfying black. We chose chunky larch sections which were cut and planed to fit the totally asymmetrical and wobbly corners of the room (the studio is L-shaped). Once this was done - not a fast stage, it should be said, Spence is something of a perfectionist - the larch is burnt using a blowtorch and a steady hand. You can see the really gnarly, delicate-looking surface of the larch, which truly looks as if you've turned up to a house fire hours too late. And it smells like that too, if you get your nose right in there - an oddity exciting smell, proper 'charred'. After the charring, comes the vanishing - but sensitively done, so as not to obliterate the textures of the burning with a brutal slathering of shiny. Wet here, the varnish soaks in to 'fix' the burnt surface: Burnt only on the underside and the sides, leaving natural larch exposed on the surface where the books would sit, from here the shelves were brought to the studio where it was over to me. We'd come up with the idea of filling any natural cracks and splits with gold. Inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi, mending precious time-served items with gold and honouring their long service rather than throwing them away or trying to hide the breaks, I first photographed the shelves placed in situ and drew lines as organically as I could over the edges, many times over, till I hand line that neither told a story nor suggested any deliberate sequence, taking my cue from Spencer himself and the notion of a totally random break or split: harder than I first thought! In fact, it took me two weeks to arrive at a set of 'cracks' I was happy with, and even then, I changed them as I worked. I tested the infill of gold with the samples that Spencer had made for us, in the process of assessing how much to burn into the wood, by Dremelling the splits in and applying both gold leaf and two gold acrylics. The idea was to fill with actual gold, via melting and pouring in, or alternatively using a rod that's melted in (NOT the correct technical term) but after research this proved both financially and technically very difficult to achieve without the input of a jeweller and specialist kit, so we decided on 23ct gold leaf - the quality of leaf above which no oxidisation takes place, and suitable for outdoor use as well as indoor. IN THE MEANTIME...the empty space where the old crate shelves were stacked was looking sad, so it was given a fresh coat of ECOS white paint, and I added a set of coloured pencils to it! I sketched them out on paper with felt tips in what felt like the right colours, squatting and holding them up against the corner, until they were right. Feeling like a big child it was massively freeing to paint something large-scale on the wall - we haven't done that for AGES - and I added some pencils which were sharp, a snapped one, a blunt one and some sharpened with a knife - like a real pencil collection. Once this was done it was time to gild. Gilding requires the surface to be smooth, sealed and dry, before a coat of size - a type of glue which doubles as a varnish, and remains sticky for a few hours - is applied, followed by the leaf itself. Every crack was Dremelled in, slowly and with a non-blinking steady hand, brushed clean with a stiff brush, and then sealed with a PVA solution. When dry, a layer of Stuart Semple's 'Goldest Gold' acrylic was applied, chosen for being the truest, richest gold I've ever come across. The acrylic acts as a sealant, and ensured that should any area not be completely covered by the gold leaf, all you'll see is the convincingly-gold acrylic edge. I highly recommend his very special gold! And then the gold leaf. A time-consuming process (if it wasn't already!) the leaf is applied with a dry brush over size applied anywhere from an our beforehand. As long as it's still sticky, you can start gilding. A little section of VERY flaky gold leaf is picked up on a dry brush, and pushed into the crack, tamped down carefully with the same dry brush - never with fingers. Despite a surprisingly modest spend on the 23ct gold, I ALMOST left the acrylic exposed, such was its goodness and glitter. here's the acrylic on the left, and some of the gilding on the right. There's just more...goldness to the gold leaf! Finally, the completed shelves were fixed in place over the pencils, burnt, gold edges facing into the room, and the books have been making their way onto them this week; stylishly re-organised for the first time in years! We're grateful to Spence for his painstaking work, carried out in a distanced, awkward masks-and-googles-on way in the middle of a lockdown, and for the opportunity for another collaboration. The next project is already underway, and we already know there'll be more after that! You can explore more of Spencer's work on his Instagram account.

  • Fire, Pencils & Gold

    We're doing a lot of re-organising and rethinking of the space we work in at the moment. It was subject to a massive redesign ten years ago but is starting to feel a bit stale (lockdown helped with that!) and this corner in particular has never been quite right. We've worked with Spencer Jenkins before on projects around the studio and the house, and when we realised it was shelving that we needed - for all the reference books, novels, catalogues and such, housed for years in repurposed wooden apple crates - we asked him. He loves wood, works in steel and willow, and creates natural forms and shapes which look simple and easy, but he'll pore over a line for for days on end, perfecting it. We'd been admirers of the work he's done in scorched larch, taking the wood and burning its surface till it reaches a deep, satisfying black. We chose chunky larch sections which were cut and planed to fit the totally asymmetrical and wobbly corners of the room (the studio is L-shaped). Once this was done - not a fast stage, it should be said, Spence is something of a perfectionist - the larch is burnt using a blowtorch and a steady hand. You can see the really gnarly, delicate-looking surface of the larch, which truly looks as if you've turned up to a house fire hours too late. And it smells like that too, if you get your nose right in there - an oddity exciting smell, proper 'charred'. After the charring, comes the vanishing - but sensitively done, so as not to obliterate the textures of the burning with a brutal slathering of shiny. Wet here, the varnish soaks in to 'fix' the burnt surface: Burnt only on the underside and the sides, leaving natural larch exposed on the surface where the books would sit, from here the shelves were brought to the studio where it was over to me. We'd come up with the idea of filling any natural cracks and splits with gold. Inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi, mending precious time-served items with gold and honouring their long service rather than throwing them away or trying to hide the breaks, I first photographed the shelves placed in situ and drew lines as organically as I could over the edges, many times over, till I hand line that neither told a story nor suggested any deliberate sequence, taking my cue from Spencer himself and the notion of a totally random break or split: harder than I first thought! In fact, it took me two weeks to arrive at a set of 'cracks' I was happy with, and even then, I changed them as I worked. I tested the infill of gold with the samples that Spencer had made for us, in the process of assessing how much to burn into the wood, by Dremelling the splits in and applying both gold leaf and two gold acrylics. The idea was to fill with actual gold, via melting and pouring in, or alternatively using a rod that's melted in (NOT the correct technical term) but after research this proved both financially and technically very difficult to achieve without the input of a jeweller and specialist kit, so we decided on 23ct gold leaf - the quality of leaf above which no oxidisation takes place, and suitable for outdoor use as well as indoor. IN THE MEANTIME...the empty space where the old crate shelves were stacked was looking sad, so it was given a fresh coat of ECOS white paint, and I added a set of coloured pencils to it! I sketched them out on paper with felt tips in what felt like the right colours, squatting and holding them up against the corner, until they were right. Feeling like a big child it was massively freeing to paint something large-scale on the wall - we haven't done that for AGES - and I added some pencils which were sharp, a snapped one, a blunt one and some sharpened with a knife - like a real pencil collection. Once this was done it was time to gild. Gilding requires the surface to be smooth, sealed and dry, before a coat of size - a type of glue which doubles as a varnish, and remains sticky for a few hours - is applied, followed by the leaf itself. Every crack was Dremelled in, slowly and with a non-blinking steady hand, brushed clean with a stiff brush, and then sealed with a PVA solution. When dry, a layer of Stuart Semple's 'Goldest Gold' acrylic was applied, chosen for being the truest, richest gold I've ever come across. The acrylic acts as a sealant, and ensured that should any area not be completely covered by the gold leaf, all you'll see is the convincingly-gold acrylic edge. I highly recommend his very special gold! And then the gold leaf. A time-consuming process (if it wasn't already!) the leaf is applied with a dry brush over size applied anywhere from an our beforehand. As long as it's still sticky, you can start gilding. A little section of VERY flaky gold leaf is picked up on a dry brush, and pushed into the crack, tamped down carefully with the same dry brush - never with fingers. Despite a surprisingly modest spend on the 23ct gold, I ALMOST left the acrylic exposed, such was its goodness and glitter. here's the acrylic on the left, and some of the gilding on the right. There's just more...goldness to the gold leaf! Finally, the completed shelves were fixed in place over the pencils, burnt, gold edges facing into the room, and the books have been making their way onto them this week; stylishly re-organised for the first time in years! We're grateful to Spence for his painstaking work, carried out in a distanced, awkward masks-and-googles-on way in the middle of a lockdown, and for the opportunity for another collaboration. The next project is already underway, and we already know there'll be more after that! You can explore more of Spencer's work on his Instagram account.

  • Grow Your Blog Community

    With Wix Blog, you’re not only sharing your voice with the world, you can also grow an active online community. That’s why the Wix blog comes with a built-in members area - so that readers can easily sign easily up to become members of your blog. What can members do? Members can follow each other, write and reply to comments and receive blog notifications. Each member gets their own personal profile page that they can customize. Tip: You can make any member of your blog a writer so they can write posts for your blog. Adding multiple writers is a great way to grow your content and keep it fresh and diversified. Here’s how to do it: Head to your Member’s Page Search for the member you want to make a writer Click on the member’s profile Click the 3 dot icon ( ⠇) on the Follow button Select Set as Writer

View All

Pages (55)

  • Inkymole | Illustration & Lettering by Sarah J. Coleman

    with a pseudonym that evolved before I’d left school. I create words and pictures - and ink is my weapon of choice! With a handsome roster of clients in advertising, design and music, and working for every major publisher in the UK and US, I’ve had solo exhibitions both sides of the Atlantic while delving into myriad extra-curricular projects. 'Wake Up!' from Only if You Dare by Josh Allen & Sarah J. Coleman Only If You Dare - my latest book with Josh Allen Halloween is coming! The Omen: The Novel! 'Wake Up!' from Only if You Dare by Josh Allen & Sarah J. Coleman 1/15 It's always delightful to work with Sarah Coleman . We've commissioned her ebullient illustrations on several projects now, and her creativity, professionalism and delivery have exceeded expectations every time. - Jackie Burrell, Bay Area News Group Sarah is a delight to work with . Her enthusiasm, experience and pure talent make her the consummate professional. She consistently goes above and beyond what we ask of her; I am often surprised by unexpected extra touches in her work. In addition to an incredible final result, you can expect flexibility, good communication, and genuine passion. She really loves what she does...and it shows! ~ Sally Morgridge, Snr. Editor, Holiday House Books ​ Watch the latest Adobe Live Classes The Inkvent Project My latest creepy book: 'Only If You Dare' Listen to the latest Radio Show October-flavoured goodies in the shop Still wearing your mask? Go full spooky!

  • All Clients | Inkymole

    A non-exhaustive list of my clients to date. Book clients are at the bottom of the page. ADVERTISING Abelson Taylor Adam & Eve Addison Advertex Communications AMV BBDO Antidote Mother Arc USA Arne New York Atomic London ATTIK Bartle Bogle Hegarty BBDO Worldwide Cadbury’s Campbell Ewald Carrefour Cementbloc CHI & Partners DDB Doberman Draft FCB Droga5 Fabrik Fast Horse Euro RSCG Harrison & Star Havas Worldwide Hudson Rouge HZDG R/GA RKCR/ Y&R FCB McCann Erickson Nitro TBWA\London TBWA\Manchester Mother Ogilvy One Marketing Grey Worldwide Prodigious Proximity London Publicis Grupo Gallegos Grey Worldwide Irish International Isobel Ketchum Fox Kalomaski Crossing Fresh Inc. Fuel Marketing Landor Associates Leo Burnett NY Leo Burnett London Leo Burnett France Lowe Worldwide Sudler & Hennessy Saatchi & Saatchi NY Spot NYC VMLYR WCRS Wunderman WWAV Rapp Collins .............................................. EDITORIAL ​ Bay Area News Group, CA Big Issue EMAP Future Publishing The Observer New York Times Decanter Magazine LA Times Radio Times Rachael Ray Magazine Sight & Sound Magazine Woman’s Health Immediate Media You Magazine The Guardian Stylist Magazine Sunday Telegraph Sunday Times Magazine Kiplinger’s Magazine Glamour Magazine Papperlappap Sight & Sound Magazine The Telegraph The Times TV Times Time Out London Time Out New York Nature Magazine New Scientist Wall Street Journal Wardour Communications Washington Post Woman’s Health Playboy Rachael Ray Magazine Vogue UK .............................................. MUSEUM & HISTORICAL Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children's Books) National Trust National Trust for Scotland Natural History Museum Royal Shakespeare Company King Richard III Visitor Centre Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Robert Burns Museum, Alloway Royal Horticultural Society .............................................. FINANCIAL Natwest Bank PNC Bank London Stock Exchange Ernst & Young .............................................. DESIGN Briggs Hillier Saatchi & Saatchi NY The Bridge Design Bridge Seven Stories Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Silk Pearce Story Studio MB Studio LR Parker Williams Newenglish Parker Williams Taxi Studio Point Five Design Zip Design Ratcliffe Fowler Premm Design .............................................. AUTOMOTIVE ​ Renault F1 Peugeot Lincoln Motor Company Scion .............................................. RETAIL Asda Booths Supermarkets Carrefour Co-op UK Target Macy's Sainsbury's Waitrose Lidl Aldi Marks & Spencer Tesco Morrison's ------------------------------------- PHARMACEUTICAL Saatchi Wellness Philanthropy Campbell Ewald Digitas Health Klick Health Inventiv Health NEON NYC Droga5 Hogarth Worldwide .............................................. OTHER THINGS Southern Poverty Law Centre Twisted Tree Games ​ Royal Mail Royal Mile Whiskies .............................................. BRANDS ​ Apple Avon Adobe BareMinerals BP Cadbury’s Cocoa Amore Coca-Cola Crabtree & Evelyn Crayola Chipotle Diamine Inks Founders Beers Glastonbury Festival Jet2 Airlines Kelloggs Kiehl's Starbucks Nestlé McDonalds Peter Graham Wines Tiffany DeBeers Unilever United Airlines .............................................. MUSIC & PERFORMANCE ​ Andrea Gibson B.Dolan Buddy Wakefield Sage Francis Katie Wirsing Rodin/2econd Class Citizen Superstar Quamallah Epitaph Records Strange Famous Records Sony .............................................. EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS Boston University New York University Johns Hopkins University .............................................. FILM & TELEVISION Directors - Aitch Alberto - Ken Loach - Julian Jarrold - Buddy Wakefield BBC Big Swing Productions/Limelight Channel 4 Creative Partnership VH1 .............................................. Book Publishing Algonquin Books Andersen Press Angry Robot Books Bloomsbury Publishing Candlewick Press Canongate Books Chicken House Clarion Books Crown Publishing Del Rey Disney-Hyperion Doubleday Ebury Publishing Egmont Publishing Faber & Faber Farrar, Strauss & Giroux Folio Society Grand Central Publishing Hachette Harlequin Books Harpercollins Hinkler Books Australia Holiday House Books Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Isis Publishing Little, Brown Little Island Books Laurence King Macmillan Publishing Mills & Boon Orion Books Pan Macmillan Penguin Books Penguin RandomHouse Picador Publicis Puffin Books Quarto Publishing Random House Scholastic Simon & Schuster Skyhorse Publishing Soho Press St. Martin’s Press Sourcebooks Summersdale Publishing Templar Publishing Tor Books Transworld Usborne Walker Books

  • Radio | Inkymole

    Radio & Broadcast Work I love radio as a medium both to listen to and be part of. With a background in the burgeoning pirate radio scene of the 90s and 00s, DJing, co-ordinating guest artists, recording interviews and of course the creative stuff, I’ve retained a life-long love of the unpredictable journey that is radio, tuning into stations around the world. I remain involved in radio wherever possible, contributing articles and doing interviews as a guest. BBC Radio I’m a frequent and enthusiastic contributor to BBC Radio Leicester, providing interviews and mini-guest slots on topical, creatively-themed subjects. You can listen to all my shows at mixcloud.com/inkymole Altar Ego Radio Over four bank holiday sessions, Altar Ego broadcast both on FM and online for 4 continuous days, playing the gamut of musical genres with a dizzying 24-hour schedule of back-to-back guest DJS. A massive technical and creative group effort, it wasn’t without its challenges and adventures! This is what we did. Pirate Radio Me, my partner, a school chum and a small team of enthusiastic and dedicated music lovers ran a tiny but far-reaching FM pirate radio station from assorted tower blocks and flats for many years; an unexpected boot camp for myriad practical, organisational, creative and people skills. We were recently interviewed about our experience with pirate radio. You can listen to Part One of the story of pirate radio on the Bureau of Lost Culture by Stephen Coates , with Jonathan More of Coldcut. We're the subject of Part Two, coming soon. ​

View All